Chekhovian Allen: There’s a Fork in the Road

Antoine Chekhov is a 19th century Russian playwright. Ironically, he needed to support his family, so he did not earn a living as a writer; Chekhov was a doctor. One of the plays he wrote include, Three Sisters, about: Olga, Masha and Irina. The first act of the play focuses on different characters moving in and out of one room. The role of “work”  is satirically mentioned in Act 1. The youngest sister, Irina, yearns for a life where her time can be utilized working, rather than doing nothing. It’s ironic how the bourgeois  class finds “working” as an excellent passage of time, whereas the working class wishes there was an easier way to live a non-stressful life.  At the end of the play, Irina says, “If we only knew….If we only knew…” This line symbolizes how we never know what the future beholds. You start by wanting and hoping for one thing, but everyone should expect the unexpected.

Woody Allen’s Hanna and Her Sisters has a similar larger implication toward life. All throughout the story, there are different characters who try to organize their lives according to what they had planned to be or whom they wish they can be like, but nothing turns out the way they plan. Life never follows a strict agenda. Once the journey of life beings, there will always be obstacles in the way. The main obstacle is emotion. Emotions are felt every second of the day. It  allows others to recognize when someone is happy, sad, jealous, angry, in love, envious, or up to no good.  When emotions are involved, anything can take a 360 degree twist. There will always be a fork in the road!

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